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James Kendzior
Hennessy & Roach
Chicago
partner

James Kendzior is a Partner, Chairperson of the Employer Liability Group, and Co-Chairperson of the Construction Practice Group with Hennessy & Roach, in Chicago, Illinois.  He handles a wide variety of matters for the firm including general liability cases involving auto liability, premises liability, breach of contract, trucking litigation, condominium associations, product liability, construction liability, subrogation, 5(b) lien recovery, and employer liability claims.  He handles all phases of the litigation process.  James has first chaired several successful jury trials, successfully defended claims for his clients at numerous arbitration hearings, mediations, and settlement conferences, and has drafted and argued many substantive motions in courts throughout Illinois.  Prior to joining Hennessy & Roach, P.C. as an attorney, James attended law school at DePaul University part-time while working at Hennessy & Roach as a law clerk full-time.

 

Education:

DePaul University College of Law, Chicago, IL

  • Juris Doctor, 2011

 

Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI

  • Bachelor of Arts – Psychology, 2003

 

Professional Affiliations:

  • Member of the Chicago Bar Association
  • Member of the Illinois Bar Association
  • Saint Ignatius College Prep Law Society Member
  • Admitted to Practice in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois Trial Bar
  • Admitted to Practice Law in Illinois and Wisconsin

 

Practice Areas:

  • Defense of General Liability claims, Insurance Defense, and Civil Litigation in Illinois and Wisconsin

 

Significant Arbitration/Commission Decisions

1. Brewer, Patricia v. Oracle Corp (07 WC 50828)

The Petitioner alleged she sustained a pulmonary embolism as the result of frequent airplane travel for her employer.  The Petitioner’s treating physicians opined that her frequent airplane travel “may” have contributed somewhat to the embolism.  Respondent’s expert opined that there was no evidence in the record to causally relate the Petitioner’s embolism with her air travel.  At trial, the Petitioner stated that she traveled 100% of the time for her job.  However, on cross, she stated that she only travels on an airplane twice a week for a total of two, one and one-half hour flights.  The arbitrator denied compensation, and held that the Petitioner did not prove that her embolism arose out of her employment or was causally related to air travel.  On appeal, the Commission affirmed the arbitrator’s decision and on additional review, the Circuit Court of Cook County confirmed the Commission’s decision.

 

The Appellate Court Affirmed after Oral Argument.

Slip and Falls: Is there a Duty to Preserve Video Surveillance?
2014